money order

an order for the payment of money, as one issued by one bank or post office and payable at another.
[1795-1805]

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Certificate requiring the issuer to pay a certain sum of money on demand to a specific person or organization.

Money orders provide a fast, safe, and convenient means of transferring small sums of money. They are issued by governments (usually through postal authorities), banks, and other qualified institutions to buyers who pay the issuer the face amount of the money order plus a service charge. Because they are exchangeable for cash on demand, they are a generally accepted means of payment. The American Express Co. began issuing money orders in 1882; the company also created the first traveler's checks nine years later. See also currency.

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      order on the issuer to pay a certain sum of money upon demand to the person named in the money order. Money orders provide a means of safe, fast, and convenient transmission of small sums of money. They are issued by sovereign governments (usually postal authorities), banks, and other qualified institutions to buyers who pay the issuer the face amount of the money order plus a service charge. Because of the unquestionable ability of the issuer to exchange the money order for cash upon demand, money orders are a generally accepted means of payment. The American Express Company, which began issuing money orders in 1882, is the largest nonbank issuer; its money orders are used throughout the world.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Money order — Money Mon ey, n.; pl. {Moneys}. [OE. moneie, OF. moneie, F. monnaie, fr. L. moneta. See {Mint} place where coin is made, {Mind}, and cf. {Moidore}, {Monetary}.] 1. A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • money order — n: an order issued by a post office, bank, or telegraph office for payment of a specified sum of money usu. at any branch of the issuing organization Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. money order …   Law dictionary

  • Money order — Order Or der, n. [OE. ordre, F. ordre, fr. L. ordo, ordinis. Cf. {Ordain}, {Ordinal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system; as: (a) Of material things, like the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • money order — money orders N COUNT A money order is a piece of paper representing a sum of money which you can buy at a post office and send to someone as a way of sending them money by post. [AM] (in BRIT, use postal,der) …   English dictionary

  • money order — money .order n an official document that you buy in a post office or a bank and send to someone so that they can exchange it for money in a bank →↑postal order …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • money order — (See postal money order.) …   Glossary of postal terms

  • money order — n. an order for the payment of a specified sum of money, as one issued for a fee at one post office, telegraph office, or bank and payable at another …   English World dictionary

  • money order — money ,order noun count an official document that you buy in a POST OFFICE as a safe way of sending money to someone …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • money order — ► NOUN ▪ a printed order for payment of a specified sum, issued by a bank or post office …   English terms dictionary

  • Money order — postal money order: Duchy of Brunswick, 1867 A money order is a payment order for a pre specified amount of money. Because it is required that the funds be prepaid for the amount shown on it, it is a more trusted method of payment than a personal …   Wikipedia

  • money order — noun a written order for the payment of a sum to a named individual; obtainable and payable at a post office (Freq. 1) • Syn: ↑postal order • Hypernyms: ↑draft, ↑bill of exchange, ↑order of payment * * * noun, pl ⋯ ders [count] …   Useful english dictionary

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