militia

/mi lish"euh/, n.
1. a body of citizens enrolled for military service, and called out periodically for drill but serving full time only in emergencies.
2. a body of citizen soldiers as distinguished from professional soldiers.
3. all able-bodied males considered by law eligible for military service.
4. a body of citizens organized in a paramilitary group and typically regarding themselves as defenders of individual rights against the presumed interference of the federal government.
[1580-90; < L militia soldiery, equiv. to milit- (s. of miles) soldier + -ia -IA]

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Military organization of citizens with limited military training who are available for emergency service, usually for local defense.

In many countries the militia is of ancient origin. The Anglo-Saxons required every able-bodied free male to serve. In colonial America it was the only defense against hostile Indians when regular British forces were not available. In the American Revolution the militia, called the Minutemen, provided the bulk of the American forces. Militias played a similar role in the War of 1812 and the American Civil War. State-controlled volunteer militias in the U.S. became the National Guard. British militia units, begun in the 16th century for home defense and answerable to the county sheriff or lord lieutenant, were absorbed into the regular army in the 20th century. Today various paramilitary organizations, from U.S. white supremacists to revolutionaries in the developing world, use the term militia to accentuate their populist origins.

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      military organization of citizens with limited military training, which is available for emergency service, usually for local defense. In many countries the militia is of ancient origin; Macedonia under Philip II (d. 336 BC), for example, had a militia of clansmen in border regions who could be called to arms to repel invaders. Among the Anglo-Saxon peoples of early medieval Europe, the militia was institutionalized in the fyrd, in which every able-bodied free male was required to give military service. Similar arrangements evolved in other countries. In general, however, the emergence in the Middle Ages of a quasi-professional military aristocracy, which performed military service in return for the right to control land and servile labour, tended to cause the militia to decay, particularly as political power became increasingly centralized and life became more secure. The institution persisted nevertheless and, with the rise of national monarchies, served in some measure to provide a manpower pool for the expanding standing armies. In France in the 18th century, one-eighteenth of the militia was required to enter the regular army each year.

      In colonial America the militia, based on the tradition of the fyrd, was the only defense against hostile Indians during the long periods when regular British forces were not available. During the American Revolution, the militia provided the bulk of the American forces as well as a pool for recruiting or drafting of regulars. The militia played a similar role in the War of 1812 and the American Civil War. After that conflict, however, the militia fell into disuse. State-controlled volunteer units, referred to as the National Guard, were formed in most states and came to serve a quasi-social function. Many of these volunteers were veterans of the Civil War, and many were from the middle classes. In the 1870s and '80s, such units were called upon by state governors to break strikes. At that time these state units constituted the nation's only trained reserve. In the 20th century, despite the parallel growth of designated reserve forces, the National Guard was called into federal service in both world wars and continued to be used in emergencies by both the state and the federal government.

      In Great Britain the Territorial Force, a militia-like reserve organization for home defense, was created in 1908. It became the Territorial Army in 1921, and overseas service was required. During World War II the militia principle was followed in the establishment of the Home Guard. Militia forces—conscripts who undergo periodic military training until retired to an inactive reserve in middle age—constitute today the bulk of the armed forces available for emergency service in Switzerland, Israel, Sweden, and several other countries. China and various other countries that maintain large standing forces and conscript reserves also support huge militia forces as territorial reserves for local defense.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • militia — n. An organization of citizens, civilians or military that defends a locality, state, or nation, but that is not part of a standing army; an organization of so called citizen soldiers, such as the National Guard. The Essential Law Dictionary.… …   Law dictionary

  • militia — [mə lish′ə] n. [L, military service, soldiery < miles (gen. militis), soldier] 1. a) Archaic any military force b) later, any army composed of citizens rather than professional soldiers, called up in time of emergency ☆ 2. in the U.S., all… …   English World dictionary

  • Militia — Mi*li tia, n. [L., military service, soldiery, fr. miles, militis, soldier: cf. F. milice.] [1913 Webster] 1. In the widest sense, the whole military force of a nation, including both those engaged in military service as a business, and those… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • militia — (n.) 1580s, system of military discipline, from L. militia military service, warfare, from miles soldier (see MILITARY (Cf. military)). Sense of citizen army (as distinct from professional soldiers) is first recorded 1690s, perhaps from a sense… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Militia — (lat.), 1) Militär u. Militärstand; 2) (M. Christi), so v.w. Jesus Christusorden 3) …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Militiä — Militiä, im Mittelalter Meaux …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Militĭa — (lat., von miles, Soldat), Kriegsdienst, Kriegsmacht, Miliz (s. d.) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • MILITIA — apud Petrum Diaconum Histor. Casin. l. 4. c. 35. Curtes, quae manifeste Imperii erant, Militias et castra Imperii: Gervasium Tilleberiensem MS. de Otiis Imperial. l. 2. Hic (Henricus II. Imperator) legem instituit apud Teutones, ut Militiae, more …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • militia — ► NOUN 1) a military force raised from the civilian population to supplement a regular army in an emergency. 2) a rebel force opposing a regular army. ORIGIN Latin, military service …   English terms dictionary

  • Militia — For other uses, see Militia (disambiguation). The Lexington Minuteman, a statue commemorating Captain John Parker, a commander of American militia forces during the American Revolutionary War. The term militia ( …   Wikipedia

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