Medellín

/me dhe yeen"/, n.
a city in W Colombia. 1,070,924.

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City (pop., 1999 est.: 1,861,265), northwestern Colombia.

It is the country's second largest city and is heavily industrialized. Founded in 1675 as a mining town, it grew rapidly after the completion of the Panama Canal and the arrival of the railroad in 1914. It is now noted for its textile mills, clothing factories, and steel mills. It is one of Colombia's largest trading centres for coffee. It also became a centre for the illegal international distribution of narcotics (mainly cocaine) in the late 20th century.

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 city, capital of Antioquia departamento, northwestern Colombia. It lies along the Porce River (a tributary of the Cauca) at an elevation of 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level, in the steep, temperate Aburrá Valley of the Cordillera Central. It is one of the nation's largest cities and is heavily industrialized, particularly in the steel industry. Medellín was founded in 1675 as a mining town, but few colonial buildings survive. It is a well-ordered city, laid out on modern planning lines. Medellín has developed a wide industrial base that includes food processing, woodworking, metallurgy, automobiles, chemicals, and rubber products; it is known as “Colombia's Manchester,” because of its textile mills and clothing factories.

      After 1914, the completion of the Panama Canal and the arrival of the railroad from Cali led to the rapid growth of Medellín, which became an important transportation crossroads. The city is connected by road to the Caribbean littoral and has an international airport. Medellín has long been one of Colombia's largest commercial centres of the coffee industry. A new international airport at nearby Rionegro was completed in the mid-1980s. Medellín became a centre for the illegal international distribution of Colombian-grown cocaine in the late 20th century. Pop. (2007 est.) 2,248,912.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Medellin — Medellín Wappen Flagge Hilfe zu Wappen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Medellín — Medellín …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Medellin — Medellín Medellín Héraldique Dr …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Medellín — • Archdiocese in the Republic of Colombia, Metropolitan of Antioquia and Manizales, in the Departments of Medellín, Antioquia, and Manizales Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Medellin     Medellín …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • MEDELLÍN — Ville de Colombie et chef lieu du département d’Antioquia, Medellín est située à 1 400 mètres d’altitude dans la vallée d’Aburra. Elle se trouve dans l’étage dit «tempéré» des Andes colombiennes. Medellín est devenu un des principaux centres… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Medellín — puede referirse a: Campañas Militares 1. Batalla de Medellín: Batalla que se libró en Medellín a principios del Siglo XIX, en la que los españoles se enfrentaron a las tropas de Napoleón. * * * C. del centro NO de Colombia, capital del… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Medellín —   [meȓe jin], Hauptstadt des Departaments Antioquia, Kolumbien, 1 500 m über dem Meeresspiegel, in der Zentralkordillere, mit 1,96 Mio. Einwohnern drittgrößte Stadt des Landes; katholischer Erzbischofssitz; zwei staatliche und zwei private… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Medellin — Medellin, 1) Stadt in der spanischen Provinz Badajoz (Estremadura), an der Guadiana, über welche eine Brücke führt, Titel einer Grafschaft, Geburtsort von Ferdinand Cortez; 3200 Ew.; dabei 19. März 1809 Sieg der Franzosen unter Victor über die… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Medellín — Medellín, 1) Stadt in der span. Provinz Badajoz. Bezirk Don Benito, am linken Ufer des Guadiana, über den eine Brücke (von 1636) führt, an der Eisenbahn Madrid Badajoz, hat ein Kastell aus dem 14. Jahrh. und (1900) 1625 Einw.; Geburtsort des… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Medellin — (spr. elljīn), Hauptstadt des kolumb. Dep. Antioquia, (1902) 53.000 E.; Bergbaubezirk …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Medellín — [mā΄dā yēn′] city in NW Colombia: pop. 1,971,000 …   English World dictionary

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