embezzlement

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Crime of fraudulently appropriating property entrusted to one's care and converting it to one's own use.

It occurs when a person gains possession of goods lawfully and then misappropriates them. It thus stands in contrast to larceny, the taking of goods from another without the latter's consent. The most widely adopted embezzlement statutes cover custodians of public funds. Many laws subject public servants to severe penalties, even if funds are lost through improper administration rather than a clear attempt to steal. See also fraud, theft.

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law
      crime generally defined as the fraudulent misappropriation of goods of another by a servant, an agent, or another person to whom possession of the goods has been entrusted. The offense has no single or precise definition. Typically, embezzlement occurs when a person gains possession of goods lawfully and subsequently misappropriates them. In this respect, embezzlement is to be contrasted with the crime of larceny, which requires the taking of goods from the possession of another without the latter's consent. The scope of the old common-law crime of larceny has been gradually extended by various manipulations of the concept of possession. An English statute of 1529 held in effect that a servant who carried away goods entrusted to him by his master had committed larceny, since the legal title as opposed to the physical possession had never been transferred to him. This extension failed to cover situations in which the servant received goods from a third person intended for his master. The failure of the law of larceny to provide adequate protection for the property of employers against the depredations of servants and employees led to the passage of specific statutes.

      Some countries limit such statutes to the misappropriation of goods received by an employee “by virtue of his employment.” Others broaden the offense to include any property of the principal received by the defendant employee. Some jurisdictions include even property passed to an employee by mistake, while others require the property to be deliberately passed. The most widely adopted statutes cover custodians of public funds. Many laws subject public servants to severe penalties, even if funds are lost through improper administration rather than a clear attempt to steal. Compare fraud; theft.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Embezzlement — A form of white collar crime where a person misappropriates the assets entrusted to him or her. In this type of fraud the assets are attained lawfully and the embezzler has the right to possess them, but the assets are then used for unintended… …   Investment dictionary

  • embezzlement — n. 1) to commit embezzlement 2) embezzlement from * * * [ɪm bez(ə)lmənt] to commit embezzlement embezzlement from …   Combinatory dictionary

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