Lord's Prayer

the /prair/
the prayer given by Jesus to His disciples, and beginning with the words Our Father. Matt. 6:9-13; Luke 11:2-4.
[1540-50]

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Prayer taught by Jesus to his disciples and used by all Christians as the basic prayer in common worship.

It appears in two forms in the New Testament: a shorter version in Luke 11:2–4, and a longer version, part of the Sermon on the Mount, in Matthew 6:9–13. In both contexts it is offered as a model of how to pray. It is sometimes called the Pater Noster (Latin: "Our Father") for its first two words.

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Latin  Oratio Dominica,  also called  Pater Noster 

      (Latin: “Our Father”), prayer taught by Jesus (Jesus Christ) to his disciples, and the principal prayer used by all Christians in common worship. It appears in two forms in the New Testament, the shorter version in Luke (Luke, Gospel According to) 11:2–4 and the longer version, part of the Sermon on the Mount, in Matthew 6:9–13. In both contexts it is offered as a model of how to pray. Many scholars believe the version in Luke to be closer to the original, the extra phrases in Matthew's (Matthew, Gospel According to) version having been added in liturgical use.

      The Lord's Prayer resembles other prayers that came out of the Jewish matrix of Jesus' time and contains three common Jewish elements: praise, petition, and a yearning for the coming Kingdom of God. It consists of an introductory address and seven petitions. The Matthean version used by the Roman Catholic church is as follows:

Our Father who art in Heaven,
Hallowed be thy name;
Thy kingdom come;
Thy will be done
On earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
And forgive us our trespasses
As we forgive those who trespass against us;
And lead us not into temptation,
But deliver us from evil.

      The English version of the Lord's Prayer used in many Protestant churches replaces the lines “And forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us” with:

And forgive us our debts
As we have forgiven our debtors

      Protestants also add the following conclusion:

For thine is the kingdom
And the power
And the glory,
Forever.

      This concluding doxology (short formula of praise) in the Protestant version was probably added early in the Christian era, since it occurs in some early manuscripts of the Gospels.

      In 1977 the Church of England adopted a new version of the Lord's Prayer, closely following a version proposed by the International Consultation on English Texts (ICET), an interdenominational commission working to bring up to date prayers and texts used in English-language churches. The new version is:

Our Father in Heaven,
Hallowed be your Name,
Your kingdom come,
Your will be done,
On earth as in Heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins
As we forgive those
Who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation
But deliver us from evil.
For the kingdom, the power,
And the glory are yours
Now and for ever.
Amen.

      A number of other churches adopted texts based on the ICET version.

      Biblical scholars disagree about Jesus' meaning in the Lord's Prayer. Some view it as “existential,” referring to present human experience on earth, while others interpret it as eschatological, referring to the coming Kingdom of God. The prayer lends itself to both interpretations, and further questions are posed by the existence of different translations and the problems inherent in the process of translation. In the case of the term “daily bread,” for example, the Greek word epiousion, which modifies “bread,” has no known parallels in Greek writing and may have meant “for tomorrow.” The petition “Give us this day our daily bread” may thus be given the eschatological interpretation “Give us today a foretaste of the heavenly banquet to come.” This interpretation is supported by Ethiopic versions and by St. Jerome's reference to the reading “bread of the future” in the lost Gospel According to the Hebrews. The eschatological interpretation suggests that the Lord's Prayer may have been used in a eucharistic setting in the early church.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lord's Prayer — • Although the Latin term oratio dominica is of early date, the phrase Lord s Prayer does not seem to have been generally familiar in England before the Reformation. During the Middle Ages the Our Father was always said in Latin, even by the… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Lord's Prayer — n the Lord s Prayer the most important prayer of the Christian religion …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Lord's Prayer — Lord s′ Prayer′ [[t]prɛər[/t]] n. rel the, the prayer given by Jesus to His disciples, beginning with the words Our Father. Matt. 6:9–13; Luke 11:2–4 …   From formal English to slang

  • Lord's Prayer — n. the prayer beginning Our Father, which Jesus taught his disciples: Matt. 6:9 13 …   English World dictionary

  • Lord's Prayer — For alternative meanings, see: Lord s Prayer (disambiguation), Our Father (disambiguation), and Pater Noster (disambiguation). The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch The Lord s Prayer (also called the Pater Noster[1] …   Wikipedia

  • Lord's Prayer — noun the prayer that Christ gave his disciples in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:9 13) • Instance Hypernyms: ↑prayer • Instance Hyponyms: ↑Paternoster • Part Holonyms: ↑Sermon on the Mount * * * the /prair/ …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lord's Prayer —    The name given to the only form of prayer Christ taught his disciples (Matt. 6:9 13). The closing doxology of the prayer is omitted by Luke (11:2 4), also in the R.V. of Matt. 6:13. This prayer contains no allusion to the atonement of Christ,… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Lord's Prayer — N PROPER: the N The Lord s Prayer is a Christian prayer that was originally taught by Jesus Christ to his followers …   English dictionary

  • Lord's Prayer — noun the Lord s Prayer the most important prayer of the Christian religion …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • Lord's Prayer — Name of the prayer given by Jesus to his disciples at their request (Matt. 6:9–13, and in a slightly different and shorter version, Luke 11:2–4). It is an essentially Jewish prayer, without specific Christian content, and each clause has… …   Dictionary of the Bible

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