John Bull

John Bullish. —John Bullishness. —John Bullism.
1. England; the English people.
2. the typical Englishman.
[1705-15; named after John Bull, chief character in Arbuthnot's allegory The History of John Bull (1712)]

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▪ English symbol
      in literature and political caricature, a conventional personification of England or of English character. Bull was invented by the Scottish mathematician and physician John Arbuthnot (Arbuthnot, John) as a character in an extended allegory that appeared in a series of five pamphlets in 1712 and later in the same year published collectively as The History of John Bull; he appeared as an honest clothier, bringing action with his linen-draper friend Nicholas Frog (Holland) against Lewis Baboon (Louis XIV) for interfering with trade. The wide circulation of the satire fixed Bull as a popular personification in 18th-century political writings.

      Subsequently, the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars brought John Bull's first great period in caricature, when such satirists as James Gillray and Thomas Rowlandson conventionalized a gross, rather stupid figure, weighed down with debt or taxation or oppression, according to the artists' political allegiance; but, less than 50 years later, “HB” (John Doyle) raised John Bull in the social scale, and he became the portly, prosperous citizen. This was the typical native representation, however; hostile foreign caricature identified him with “perfidious Albion.”

      John Bull's widest recognition came in the middle and late 19th century, especially through the influential cartoons portraying him in the periodical Punch. The most familiar and frequent representation was that developed by Punch cartoonists John Leech and Sir John Tenniel: the jovial and honest farmer figure, solid and foursquare, sometimes in Union Jack waistcoat and with bulldog at heel. John Bull had by now become so universally familiar that the name frequently appeared in book, play, and periodical titles and pictorially as a brand name or trademark for manufactured goods.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

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  • John Bull — ► NOUN ▪ a personification of England or the typical Englishman. ORIGIN from a character in John Arbuthnot s satire Law is a Bottomless Pit; or, the History of John Bull (1712) …   English terms dictionary

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