invention

inventional, adj.inventionless, adj.
/in ven"sheuhn/, n.
1. the act of inventing.
2. U.S. Patent Law. a new, useful process, machine, improvement, etc., that did not exist previously and that is recognized as the product of some unique intuition or genius, as distinguished from ordinary mechanical skill or craftsmanship.
3. anything invented or devised.
4. the power or faculty of inventing, devising, or originating.
5. an act or instance of creating or producing by exercise of the imagination, esp. in art, music, etc.
6. something fabricated, as a false statement.
7. Sociol. the creation of a new culture trait, pattern, etc.
8. Music. a short piece, contrapuntal in nature, generally based on one subject.
9. Rhet. (traditionally) one of the five steps in speech preparation, the process of choosing ideas appropriate to the subject, audience, and occasion.
10. Archaic. the act of finding.
[1300-50; ME invencio(u)n < L invention- (s. of inventio) a finding out, equiv. to invent(us) (see INVENT) + -ion- -ION]

* * *

      in music, any of a number of markedly dissimilar compositional forms dating from the 16th century to the present. While its exact meaning has never been defined, the term has often been affixed to compositions of a novel, progressive character—i.e., compositions that do not fit established categories. The earliest-known use of the term in Premier livre des inventions musicales (1555; “First Book of Musical Inventions”) by the Frenchman Clément Janequin clearly alludes to the composer's highly original programmatic chansons—secular French part-songs containing extramusical allusions (e.g., imitations of battle sounds and birdcalls). Similarly capricious or novel effects occur in John Dowland's Invention for Two to Play upon One Lute (1597); Lodovico da Viadana's Cento concerti ecclesiasticiNova inventione (1602; “One-Hundred Ecclesiastical Concerti…New Invention”), the first sacred collection to require a basso continuo; and Antonio Vivaldi's Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'invenzione, Opus 8 (1720; “The Contest Between Harmony and Invention”), which contains, among others, a number of programmatic concerti.

      Best known perhaps is the set of two-part inventions and 15 three-part sinfonias (often called Three-Part Inventions) for harpsichord (c. 1720) by J.S. Bach (Bach, Johann Sebastian), each of which is characterized by the contrapuntal elaboration of a single melodic idea and for which Francesco Bonporti's Invenzioni for violin and bass (1712) may have served as a model.

      Twentieth-century composers of pieces entitled “Invention” include the Austrian Alban Berg and the Russian-American composer Alexander Tcherepnin, who followed Bach's lead more or less directly.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • INVENTION — L’invention est l’acte de produire par ses propres moyens un élément, un objet ou un processus original; plus généralement, de produire ou de créer en utilisant son imagination: inventer une machine, inventer une histoire. Le terme a aussi un… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • invention — Invention. s. f. v. Qualité, faculté, disposition de l esprit à inventer. Ce Poëte n a point d invention. il a l invention belle, heureuse. cet artisan est homme d invention, est plein d invention. Il se prend aussi pour l action d inventer, &… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Invention — In*ven tion, n. [L. inventio: cf. F. invention. See {Invent}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of finding out or inventing; contrivance or construction of that which has not before existed; as, the invention of logarithms; the invention of the art of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • invention — in‧ven‧tion [ɪnˈvenʆn] noun 1. [countable] a new product that was not available before: • Do you realise that the paint roller is a Canadian invention? • There were displays of new inventions in the exhibition halls. 2. [uncountable] when… …   Financial and business terms

  • invention — in·ven·tion n: a device, process, or discovery under U.S. patent law that is new and useful, that reflects extraordinary creative ability or skill, and that makes a distinct and recognized contribution to and advancement of science; also: the act …   Law dictionary

  • invention — Invention, Constitutio, Machinatio, Inuentio, Inuentus, huius inuentus, Excogitatio. Invention ou allegation qu on fait par malice plus que par bonne foy, Calumnia. Inventions et tromperies pour venir à la fin de ses attaintes, Machinae. C est… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • invention — (n.) c.1400, devised method of organization, from O.Fr. invencion (13c.) and directly from L. inventionem (nom. inventio) faculty of invention; a finding, discovery, noun of action from pp. stem of invenire devise, discover, find, from in in, on… …   Etymology dictionary

  • invention — [n1] creation, creativeness apparatus, black box*, brainchild*, coinage, concoction, contraption, contrivance, creativity, design, development, device, discovery, doodad*, gadget, genius, gimmick, gizmo*, imagination, ingenuity, innovation,… …   New thesaurus

  • Invention — (v. lat.), 1) das Finden, Auffinden; so Inventio sanctae crucis, Kreuzerfindung; 2) Erfindung; 3) Kunstgriff. Daher Inventiös, erfinderisch …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Invention — (lat., franz.), Erfindung, Kunstgriff; bei Seb. Bach Bezeichnung für kleine, zwei und dreistimmige Klavierstücke im imitatorischen Stil; inventiös, erfinderisch, sinnreich …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Invention — (lat.), Erfindung; kurze Instrumentalsätze. Inventiös, erfinderisch, erfindungsreich, sinnreich …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.