ignition system

the system in an internal-combustion engine that produces the spark to ignite the mixture of fuel and air: includes the battery, ignition coil, distributor, spark plugs, and associated switches and wiring.
[1900-05]

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In a gasoline engine, the means used for producing an electric spark to ignite the fuel-air mixture in the cylinders to produce the motive force.

The ignition system consists of a storage battery recharged by a generator, an induction coil, a device to produce timed high-voltage discharges from the induction coil, a distributor, and a set of spark plugs. The battery provides an electric current of low voltage, usually 12 volts, that is converted by the system to some 40,000 volts. The distributor routes the successive bursts of high-voltage current to each spark plug in the proper firing order.

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      in a gasoline engine, means employed for producing an electric spark to ignite the fuel–air mixture; the burning of this mixture in the cylinders produces the motive force.

      The basic components in the ignition system are a storage battery, an induction coil, a device to produce timed high-voltage discharges from the induction coil, a distributor, and a set of spark plugs. The storage battery provides an electric current of low voltage (usually 12 volts) that is converted by the system to high voltage (some 40,000 volts). The distributor routes the successive bursts of high-voltage current to each spark plug in the firing order.

      In older automobile ignition systems, the high-voltage pulses are produced by means of breaker points controlled by a revolving distributor cam. When the points are in contact they complete an electrical circuit through the primary winding of the ignition coil. When the points are separated by the cam, the primary circuit is broken, which creates a high-voltage surge in the secondary windings of the induction coil. Breaker points have been largely replaced by electronic devices in newer automobiles (automobile). Most now use a magnetic device, called a reluctor, that is operated by the distributor shaft to produce timed electric signals, which are amplified and used to control the current to the induction coil. These newer ignition systems are more reliable than the old, permit better control of the engine, and produce higher-voltage output to the spark plugs.

      During the evolution of solid-state ignition systems, there have been many modifications. Some ignition conversion systems, for example, extend breaker-point life by using transistors (transistor), devices in which a small current in the input (the breaker-point circuit) controls a much larger current in the output (the coil primary circuit).

      Many automobile engines now use a distributor-less ignition system, or direct-ignition system, in which a high-voltage pulse is directly applied to coils that sit on top of the spark plugs (known as coil-on-plug). The major components of these systems are a coil pack, an ignition module, a crankshaft reluctor ring, a magnetic sensor, and an electronic control module. The ignition module controls the primary circuit to the coils, turning them on and off. The reluctor ring is mounted on the crankshaft so that as the crankshaft rotates the magnetic sensor is triggered by notches in the reluctor ring. The magnetic sensor provides position information to the electronic control module, which governs ignition timing.

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Universalium. 2010.

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