harp seal

a northern earless seal, Pagophilus groenlandicus, with pale-yellow fur darkening to gray with age, of coasts, drifting ice, and seas of the North Atlantic Ocean, hunted for its fur.
[1775-85; so called from the harplike shape of markings on the backs of adults]

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Migratory earless seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus, sometimes Phoca groenlandica) of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans.

The adult male is light grayish or yellowish, with brown or black on the head and a similarly coloured U-shaped marking on the back and sides. The female is less clearly marked. Adults are about 6 ft (1.8 m) long and 400 lb (180 kg). Strong swimmers, harp seals feed on fish and crustaceans and spend much of the year at sea. They breed near Newfoundland, Can., and in the Greenland and White seas. Until two weeks old, the pups bear a fluffy white coat highly valued by the fur trade; public indignation over hunting methods (including clubbing) has led to increased regulation and supervision of sealing activities in the Newfoundland area.

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mammal
Introduction
also called  saddleback 
 medium-sized, grayish earless seal possessing a black harp-shaped or saddle-shaped marking on its back. Harp seals are found on or near ice floes from the Kara Sea of Russia west to the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Saint Lawrence, Gulf of) in Canada. The harp seal is both the best-known and among the most abundant of all seal species. Worldwide, the total population of harp seals is estimated at nearly 7.5 million animals, which are separated into three distinct populations. The largest population (approximately 5 million animals in 2000) inhabits the northwestern Atlantic and breeds both near the coast of Newfoundland and within the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The second largest population occurs in the vicinity of the Barents Sea, numbers between 1.5 million and 2 million animals, and breeds on the ice-covered White Sea in northwest Russia. The smallest population (approximately 300,000 animals) inhabits the area between Norway's Jan Mayen Island (Jan Mayen) and the eastern coast of Greenland, and its mating grounds are mainly located near Jan Mayen Island. Each population is considered by some authorities to be a separate subspecies.

Life cycle
 The colloquial names for harp seals vary by age and coloration. At birth, pups are known as “whitecoats” because of their pure white pelage. This stage lasts approximately two weeks. The subsequent growth of dark hair under their white fur produces a grayish coloration, and they are called “graycoats.” Once the white coat is completely shed, the seals become gray with dark spots and are often referred to as “beaters” because of the sound made by their tails as they learn to swim. At 13–14 months of age the seals molt again, and their spotted pelt remains. At this stage they are called “bedlamers.” The transition from bedlamer to adult coloration arrives with the onset of sexual maturity, which usually occurs at four or five years of age.

      Harp seals spend most of their lives in the water, though some have been known to ride bits of drifting sea ice for short distances during migration. All harp seals must come up on land or ice to give birth, rear their young, and molt. From late February to March, seals relocate to the southern limit of their range to breed and give birth.

      Pups are born on the short-lived seasonal platform of pack ice. Each female gives birth to only one pup; twins are extremely rare. Pups weigh 11 kg (24 pounds) at birth, but they lack the thick layer of blubber present in adults. Instead, they are insulated by their thick fur and obtain energy from their mothers' milk, which is rich in fat. During their 12-day nursing period, pups gain about 2 kg (4.4 pounds) per day of blubber, which allows them to attain a weight of approximately 36 kg (79 pounds) at weaning. Weaning is abrupt as females stop nursing their young in order to mate with males. During this time, since the pups do not feed for up to six weeks, they may lose over 50 percent of their body mass. Eventually, hunger motivates the pups to enter the water and start feeding on their own.

      Average-sized adults of both sexes measure 1.8 metres in length (6 feet). Male harp seals typically weigh 135 kg (300 pounds), females weigh 120 kg (265 pounds), and the largest adults may reach 180 kg (400 pounds). The face of an adult harp seal is completely black, while the gray coloration of its body is accented by a black harp-shaped marking on its back. Adults typically hold this coloration between five years of age and the end of their lives. The maximum life span for the harp seal is 35 years.

      Adult seals mate either within the water or on top of ice floes. When fertilization occurs, the egg develops into a blastocyst, which floats freely within the uterus for four months until it implants itself in the uterine lining for active development. This delay in implantation stretches gestation time to 11.5 months and effectively postpones the birth of young to the period when enough pack ice is available to act as a whelping platform.

      Harp seals are not strong divers compared with other seal species. Their maximum dive depth is 370 metres (1,200 feet), and they may stay underwater for only 16 minutes before resurfacing. Though they consume a wide variety of prey, their diet is centred on small fishes (fish) such as capelin (Mallotus villosus), Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), or polar cod (Arctogadus glacialis). They also eat numerous invertebrates (invertebrate). Contrary to popular belief, harp seals rarely consume the commercially important Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Polar bears (polar bear) (Ursus maritimus), killer whales (killer whale) (Orcinus orca), and large sharks (shark) are the natural predators of harp seals.

The sealing industry
 Harp seals have been hunted commercially for over two centuries. The commercial sealing industry began with the harvest of adult harp seals in Newfoundland and Labrador during the middle of the 18th century. Recoverable seal parts include meat (for Asian pet food and meat markets), skins (for waterproof coats and boots), fur (for coats), genitals (for aphrodisiacs), and blubber (which is used to produce seal oil). In the 1960s, public indignation at the harvest of whitecoats brought strict regulations and tight governmental controls over harvesting activities, particularly with respect to humane killing and the enforcement of annual quotas. The Canadian (Canada) hunt, occurring in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and off the coasts of Labrador and Newfoundland, was at the centre of this controversy, though the Norwegian and Russian hunts also received scrutiny. Since 1987 the harvesting of whitecoats has been illegal in Canadian waters; however, once the animals begin to shed their white fur when 12–14 days old, entering the graycoat stage, they may be hunted. The primary method of dispatch involves the use of a hakapik—a heavy wooden club with a small metal hook on one end—to crush the skull of the animal. This method is more common than hunting with firearms (which is also legal under current rules), because hunters are required to make sure each harp seal is dead before harvesting another. Most Canadian seal hunters are commercial fishermen who seek to supplement their incomes during the fishing off-season.

      Between the 1950s and '70s, hunting pressure caused the world harp seal population to decline to around 1.5 million animals. About this time the killing of whitecoats began to generate worldwide public outrage, and in 1983 the European Union instituted a ban on seal products. These factors brought about a collapse in the market. In response, during the 1980s and early '90s Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) set the annual “total allowable catch” (TAC) of harp seals at 186,000 animals—though the average number of harp seals killed by Canadian hunters each year during this time actually dropped to about 51,000, possibly because of the negative publicity and loss of markets. The smaller hunts occurring during this time allowed the harp seal population to recover.

      As an outgrowth of this recovery and the Canadian government's successful marketing of seal fur in the economically emerging countries of East Asia, the DFO increased the TAC to 240,000 in 1996. For the remainder of the decade, an average of about 270,000 seals was killed each year. In the early part of the 21st century, the DFO introduced a series of measures to expand the harvest further. In 2003 the first three-year plan was adopted, designed to allow the harvesting of 975,000 seals over three years but to forbid the taking of more than 350,000 in any given year. The new plans have been forced to adapt to changing conditions, however. For instance, in 2007, because of reductions in ice coverage in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the coasts of Labrador and Newfoundland, the TAC was reduced to 270,000. The annual seal harvest remains an object of highly publicized controversy, attracting much international media coverage.

Serge Lariviere

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Harp seal — Harp Harp (h[aum]rp), n. [OE. harpe, AS. hearpe; akin to D. harp, G. harfe, OHG. harpha, Dan. harpe, Icel. & Sw. harpa.] 1. A musical instrument consisting of a triangular frame furnished with strings and sometimes with pedals, held upright, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • harp seal — harp′ seal n. mam a N Atlantic earless seal Pagophilus groenlandicus[/ex] • Etymology: 1775–85; so called from the harp shaped markings on their backs …   From formal English to slang

  • harp seal — n. a migratory, earless arctic seal (Phoca groenlandica) having pups with silky, white fur …   English World dictionary

  • Harp Seal — Taxobox name = Harp Seal status = LR/lc status system = iucn2.3 status ref =IUCN2006|assessors=Seal Specialist Group|year=1996|id=41671|title=Pagophilus groenlandicus|downloaded=12 May 2006 ] image width = 240px range range map width = 240px… …   Wikipedia

  • harp seal — noun common Arctic seal; the young are all white • Syn: ↑Pagophilus groenlandicus • Hypernyms: ↑earless seal, ↑true seal, ↑hair seal • Member Holonyms: ↑Pagophilus, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • harp seal — grenlandinis ruonis statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas taksono rangas rūšis atitikmenys: lot. Pagophilus groenlandica angl. Greenland seal; harp seal; saddleback; saddle backed seal vok. Grönlandrobbe; grönländischer Seehund; mondfleckiger… …   Žinduolių pavadinimų žodynas

  • harp seal — noun a slender North Atlantic seal that typically has a dark harp shaped mark on its grey back. [Phoca groenlandica.] …   English new terms dictionary

  • harp seal — noun A species () of true seal (or earless seal) found in the northernmost Atlantic Ocean and adjacent parts of the Arctic Ocean …   Wiktionary

  • harp seal — noun Etymology: from the shape of its markings Date: 1766 a dark faced seal (Phoca groenlandicus) of the North Atlantic that is a variable light gray with the male usually having a dark crescent on its back and sides …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Harp — (h[aum]rp), n. [OE. harpe, AS. hearpe; akin to D. harp, G. harfe, OHG. harpha, Dan. harpe, Icel. & Sw. harpa.] 1. A musical instrument consisting of a triangular frame furnished with strings and sometimes with pedals, held upright, and played… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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