hang gliding

the sport of launching oneself from a cliff or a steep incline and soaring through the air by means of a hang glider.
[1970-75]

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Sport of flying in unpowered aircraft that are light enough to be carried by the pilot.

Takeoff is usually achieved by launching into the air from a cliff or hill. Hang gliders were developed by the pioneers of practical flight. In Germany, starting in 1891, Otto Lilienthal made several thousand flights before a fatal gliding accident in 1896. In the U.S. collaboration between Augustus Herring and Octave Chanute resulted in successful flights of a biplane hang glider in 1896. Modern hang gliding emerged toward the end of the 1960s. In the early 1960s enthusiasts in California were gliding down coastal dunes on homebuilt delta-shaped wings they had adapted from kite designs developed by Francis and Gertrude Rogallo. The Rogallos' kites had attracted attention because of NASA's interest in using them for spacecraft retrieval. By the early 1970s the sport had spread throughout the U.S. and into Europe. World championships in hang gliding have been held and records kept since 1975.

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sport
      sport of flying in lightweight unpowered aircraft which can be carried by the pilot. Takeoff is usually achieved by launching into the air from a cliff or hill. Hang gliders were developed by the pioneers of practical flight. In Germany, starting in 1891, Otto Lilienthal (Lilienthal, Otto) made several thousand flights before a fatal gliding accident in 1896. He published plans of his gliders and even supplied kits. In the United States collaboration between Augustus Herring and Octave Chanute (Chanute, Octave) resulted in successful flights of a biplane hang glider from dunes in Indiana at the southern end of Lake Michigan in 1896. In these early designs the pilot hung from the armpits on parallel bars beneath the wings, swinging hips and legs to control roll and shifting back and forth to influence pitch.

      Modern hang gliding emerged toward the end of the 1960s. In the early 1960s enthusiasts in California were gliding down coastal dunes on homebuilt delta-shaped wings they had adapted from kite designs developed by Francis Rogallo and his wife, Gertrude. The Rogallos' kites had attracted attention because of NASA's interest in using them for spacecraft retrieval. On the dunes cheap materials such as bamboo and plastic sheeting were used, and the parallel-bar control method remained. Around the same time, water-ski showmen in Australia were flying on flat kites towed behind speedboats. They were able to control these notoriously unstable flat kites by using swing seats that allowed their entire body weight to effect pitch and roll—a great improvement on the parallel-bar method. When a Rogallo wing was fitted with a swing seat by John Dickenson, in Sydney, Australia, the modern hang glider was born.

      By the early 1970s the sport had spread throughout the United States and into Europe. Aircraft-quality materials began to be used, and glide performance increased steadily through improvements in wing and harness design. The original Rogallos with a seated pilot had glide ratios of about 3:1. That is, for every three feet traveled forward, they would descend one foot. By 1999 glide ratios had reached 15:1. In addition to the now-traditional delta-shaped flexible wings, a new generation of rigid, tailless hang gliders have become popular, in which carbon fibre and other composite materials provide the required blend of lightness and strength. Glide ratios in excess of 20:1 are possible, coupled with top speeds of about 62 miles per hour (100 km per hour), yet they can still launch and land at little more than walking pace.

      Like all other engineless aircraft, hang gliders use gravity as the source of propulsion, so they are always sinking downward, just as a skier goes downhill. However, by seeking air that is moving upward faster than the aircraft is sinking, skilled pilots can remain aloft for hours. Typical sources for such lift occur where wind is deflected upward by a hill or mountain ridge or in columns of warm air called “thermals (thermal),” which are caused by the sun heating the Earth's surface unevenly. Such is the efficiency of modern hang gliders that by 1999 the world straight distance record was 308 miles (495 km). Hang gliders are highly maneuverable, and their safety record compares well with that of other aviation sports.

      Internationally, hang gliding is under the control of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (Féderátion Aéronautique Internationale) (FAI). World championships have been held, usually in alternate years, ever since the first in Kössen, Austria, in 1975. Competition is generally based on cross-country soaring, although a trial of a new championship for short-course downhill racing occurred at Mount Olympus, Greece, in 1999.

Noel Whittall
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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