gold reserve

the stock of gold held by a government or central bank to back its promissory notes or currency or to settle its international debts.
[1865-70, Amer.]

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Fund of gold bullion or coin held by a government or bank.

In the past, banks accumulated gold reserves to fulfill their promise to pay their depositors in gold. Commercial banks received deposits subject to repayment in gold on demand and issued notes redeemable in gold on demand. Most gold reserves eventually shifted to central banks, which took over the function of issuing paper money. Gold reserves were moved again in the 1930s, when many governments required their central banks to turn over to the national treasuries all or most of their gold holdings. In the U.S., the Gold Reserve Act of 1934 required Federal Reserve banks to turn over all gold bullion or coin to the U.S. Treasury, which placed most of the reserves at Fort Knox.

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      a fund of gold bullion or coin held by a government or bank, as distinguished from a private hoard of gold held by an individual or nonfinancial institution.

      In the past, reserves were accumulated by rulers and governments primarily to meet the costs of waging war, and in most eras governmental policy greatly emphasized the acquiring and holding of “treasure.” Banks accumulated gold reserves to redeem their promises to pay their depositors in gold.

      During the 19th century, banks supplanted governments as the principal holders of gold reserves. Commercial banks received deposits subject to repayment in gold on demand and issued notes (paper money) that were redeemable in gold on demand; hence each bank had to hold a reserve of gold coins to meet redemption demands. In the course of time, however, the preponderant portion of the gold reserves shifted to central banks. Because the notes of commercial banks were wholly or largely replaced by notes of the central bank, the commercial banks needed little or no gold for note redemption. The commercial banks also came to depend upon the central bank for gold needed to meet the demands of their depositors.

      In the 1930s many governments required their central banks to turn over to the national treasuries all or most of their gold holdings. For example, in the United States, the Gold Reserve Act of 1934 stipulated that the U.S. Treasury should take title to all gold coin, gold bullion, and gold certificates held by the central Federal Reserve banks, giving gold certificates of a new type and gold credits on its books in exchange. The U.S. Treasury placed most of its gold reserve at Fort Knox, Ky. But not all governments “nationalized” gold, with the result that the status of gold reserves varies from country to country. In some countries, monetary gold reserves are held exclusively by the national government; in others they are held largely by the central bank; and in still others they are held partly by the government and partly by the central bank.

      Regardless of the holder, however, the use of gold reserves is now limited almost exclusively to the settlement of international transactions—and, even then, only rarely.

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Universalium. 2010.

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