foxglove

/foks"gluv'/, n.
any Eurasian plant belonging to the genus Digitalis, of the figwort family, esp. D. purpurea, having drooping, tubular, purple or white flowers on tall spikes, and leaves that are the source of digitalis in medicine.
[bef. 1000; ME foxes glove, OE foxes glofa. See FOX, GLOVE]

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Any of 20–30 species of herbaceous plants of the genus Digitalis, in the snapdragon family, especially D. purpurea, the common, or purple, foxglove.

Native to Europe, the Mediterranean region, and the Canary Islands, foxgloves typically produce ovate to oblong leaves toward the lower part of the stem, which is capped by a tall, one-sided cluster of pendulous, bell-shaped, purple, yellow, or white flowers, often marked with spots within. D. purpurea is cultivated as the source of the heart-stimulating drug digitalis.

Foxglove (Digitalis)

Derek Fell

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plant
 any of about 20 species of herbaceous plants of the genus Digitalis (family Scrophulariaceae, now in the segregate family Antirrhinaceae), especially D. purpurea, the common, or purple, foxglove, which is cultivated commercially as the source of the heart-stimulating drug digitalis. Foxgloves are native to Europe, the Mediterranean region, and the Canary Islands, and they typically grow to a height of 45 to 150 cm (18 to 60 inches).

      The plants produce alternating, ovate to oblong leaves toward the lower part of the stem, which is capped by a tall, one-sided cluster of pendulous, bell-shaped flowers, each of which may be up to 6.5 cm (2.5 inches) long. The flowers may be purple, yellow, or white and are often marked with spots within. Most species are biennials, meaning they flower during their second year and then die after seeding.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Foxglove — Fox glove , n. [AS. foxes gl[=o]fa, foxes cl[=o]fa,foxes clife.] (Bot.) Any plant of the genus {Digitalis}. The common English foxglove ({Digitalis purpurea}) is a handsome perennial or biennial plant, whose leaves are used as a powerful medicine …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • foxglove — O.E. foxes glofa; the reason for FOX (Cf. fox) is uncertain. Cf. O.E. foxesfot ( fox foot ) xiphion; foxesclate burdock …   Etymology dictionary

  • foxglove — ► NOUN ▪ a tall plant with erect spikes of typically pinkish purple flowers shaped like the fingers of gloves …   English terms dictionary

  • foxglove — [fäks′gluv΄] n. [ME foxes glove < OE foxes glofa, fox s glove] DIGITALIS …   English World dictionary

  • foxglove — paprastoji rusmenė statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Bervidinių šeimos dekoratyvinis, vaistinis nuodingas augalas (Digitalis purpurea), paplitęs pietų Europoje ir šiaurės Afrikoje. atitikmenys: lot. Digitalis purpurea angl. common foxglove;… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

  • foxglove — UK [ˈfɒksˌɡlʌv] / US [ˈfɑksˌɡlʌv] noun [countable] Word forms foxglove : singular foxglove plural foxgloves a tall plant with purple or white flowers shaped like bells …   English dictionary

  • foxglove — [[t]fɒ̱ksglʌv[/t]] foxgloves N VAR A foxglove is a tall plant that has pink or white flowers shaped like bells growing up its stem …   English dictionary

  • foxglove — /ˈfɒksglʌv/ (say foksgluv) noun any plant of the genus Digitalis, especially D. purpurea, the common foxglove, a native of Europe, bearing drooping, tubular, purple or white flowers, and leaves that are used medicinally. See digitalis. {Middle… …   Australian English dictionary

  • foxglove — rusmenė statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Bervidinių (Scrophulariaceae) šeimos augalų gentis (Digitalis). atitikmenys: lot. Digitalis angl. foxglove vok. Fingerhut rus. наперстянка lenk. naparstnica; naparstnik …   Dekoratyvinių augalų vardynas

  • foxglove — noun Date: before 12th century any of a genus (Digitalis) of erect herbs of the snapdragon family; especially a common European biennial or perennial (D. purpurea) cultivated for its showy racemes of dotted white or purple tubular flowers and as… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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