flock

flock1
flockless, adj.
/flok/, n.
1. a number of animals of one kind, esp. sheep, goats, or birds, that keep or feed together or are herded together.
2. a large number of people; crowd.
3. a large group of things: a flock of letters to answer.
4. (in New Testament and ecclesiastical use)
a. the Christian church in relation to Christ.
b. a single congregation in relation to its pastor.
5. Archaic. a band or company of persons.
v.i.
6. to gather or go in a flock or crowd: They flocked around the football hero.
[bef. 1000; (n.) ME; OE floc; c. ON flokkr; (v.) ME, deriv. of the n.]
Syn. 1, 2. bevy, covey, flight, gaggle; brood, hatch, litter; shoal, school, swarm, group, company. FLOCK, DROVE, HERD, PACK refer to a company of animals, often under the care or guidance of someone. FLOCK is the popular term, which applies to groups of animals, esp. of sheep or goats, and companies of birds: This lamb is the choicest of the flock. A flock of wild geese flew overhead. DROVE is esp. applied to a number of oxen, sheep, or swine when driven in a group: A drove of oxen was taken to market. A large drove of swine filled the roadway.
HERD is usually applied to large animals such as cattle, originally meaning those under the charge of someone; but by extension, to other animals feeding or driven together: a buffalo herd; a herd of elephants. PACK applies to a number of animals kept together or keeping together for offense or defense: a pack of hounds kept for hunting; a pack of wolves. As applied to people, DROVE, HERD, and PACK carry a contemptuous implication.
flock2
/flok/, n.
1. a lock or tuft of wool, hair, cotton, etc.
2. (sometimes used with a pl. v.) wool refuse, shearings of cloth, old cloth torn to pieces, or the like, for upholstering furniture, stuffing mattresses, etc.
3. Also called flocking. (sometimes used with a pl. v.) finely powdered wool, cloth, etc., used for producing a velvetlike pattern on wallpaper or cloth or for coating metal.
4. floc (def. 1).
v.t.
5. to stuff with flock, as a mattress.
6. to decorate or coat with flock, as wallpaper, cloth, or metal.
[1250-1300; ME flok < OF floc < L floccus FLOCCUS. Compare OHG floccho]

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Flock — Flock, n. [AS. flocc flock, company; akin to Icel. flokkr crowd, Sw. flock, Dan. flok; prob. orig. used of flows, and akin to E. fly. See {Fly}.] 1. A company or collection of living creatures; especially applied to sheep and birds, rarely to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Flock — Flock, n. [OE. flokke; cf. D. vlok, G. flocke, OHG. floccho, Icel. fl[=o]ki, perh. akin to E. flicker, flacker, or cf. L. floccus, F. floc.] 1. A lock of wool or hair. [1913 Webster] I prythee, Tom, beat Cut s saddle, put a few flocks in the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flock — Ⅰ. flock [1] ► NOUN 1) a number of birds moving or resting together. 2) a number of domestic animals, especially sheep, that are kept together. 3) (a flock/flocks) a large number or crowd. 4) a Christian congregation under the charge of a… …   English terms dictionary

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  • Flock — Flock, v. t. To flock to; to crowd. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Good fellows, trooping, flocked me so. Taylor (1609). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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