fling

/fling/, v., flung, flinging, n.
v.t.
1. to throw, cast, or hurl with force or violence: to fling a stone.
2. to move (oneself) violently with impatience, contempt, or the like: She flung herself angrily from the room.
3. to put suddenly or violently: to fling a suspect into jail.
4. to project or speak sharply, curtly, or forcefully: He flung his answer at the questioner.
5. to involve (oneself) vigorously in an undertaking.
6. to move, do, or say (something) quickly: to fling a greeting in passing.
7. to send suddenly and rapidly: to fling fresh troops into a battle.
8. to throw aside or off.
9. to throw to the ground, as in wrestling or horseback riding.
v.i.
10. to move with haste or violence; rush; dash.
11. to fly into violent and irregular motions, as a horse; throw the body about, as a person.
12. to speak harshly or abusively (usually fol. by out): He flung out disgustedly against the whole human race.
n.
13. an act of flinging.
14. a short period of unrestrained pursuit of one's wishes or desires: The week of partying was my last fling before starting a new job.
15. an attempt at something: He took a fling at playwriting.
16. a critical or contemptuous remark; gibe.
17. Also called Highland fling. a lively Scottish dance characterized by flinging movements of the arms and legs.
[1250-1300; ME; cf. Sw flänga to fly, race]

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Fling — (fl[i^]ng), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Flung} (fl[u^]ng); p. pr. & vb. n. {Flinging}.] [OE. flingen, flengen, to rush, hurl; cf. Icel. flengia to whip, ride furiously, OSw. flenga to strike, Sw. fl[ a]nga to romp, Dan. flenge to slash.] 1. To cast,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fling — fling; fling·er; pif·fling; scuf·fling·ly; skif·fling; tri·fling·ly; tri·fling·ness; tri·fling; baf·fling·ly; baf·fling·ness; shuf·fling·ly; snuf·fling·ly; sti·fling·ly; …   English syllables

  • Fling — Fling, n. 1. A cast from the hand; a throw; also, a flounce; a kick; as, the fling of a horse. [1913 Webster] 2. A severe or contemptuous remark; an expression of sarcastic scorn; a gibe; a sarcasm. [1913 Webster] I, who love to have a fling,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fling — may refer to:*Fling a brief casual relationship. *Fling (film) a 2008 John Stewart Muller film *FLING, the Struggle Front for the National Independence of Guinea * Fling , a song by Built to Spill from their 1994 album There s Nothing Wrong with… …   Wikipedia

  • Fling — Fling, v. i. 1. To throw; to wince; to flounce; as, the horse began to kick and fling. [1913 Webster] 2. To cast in the teeth; to utter abusive language; to sneer; as, the scold began to flout and fling. [1913 Webster] 3. To throw one s self in a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fling — ► VERB (past and past part. flung) 1) throw forcefully; hurl. 2) (fling oneself into) wholeheartedly engage in (an activity or enterprise). 3) move with speed: he flung away to his study. 4) (fling on/off) put on or take off (clothes) carelessly… …   English terms dictionary

  • fling — [fliŋ] vt. flung, flinging [ME flingen, to rush < ON flengja, to whip (Norw dial., to throw) < IE base * plāk : see FLAW2] 1. to throw, esp. with force or violence; hurl; cast 2. to put abruptly or violently [to be flung into confusion] 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • fling on — ˌfling ˈon [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they fling on he/she/it flings on present participle flinging on past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • fling — (v.) c.1300, probably from or related to O.N. flengja to flog, of uncertain origin. The M.E. intransitive sense is that suggested by phrase have a fling at make a try. The noun meaning attempt, attack is from early 14c. Sense of period of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • fling — [n1] casual throw cast, chuck, firing, heave, hurl, launching, lob, peg, pitch, shot, slinging, toss; concept 222 fling [n2] unrestrained behavior affair, attempt, binge, celebration, crack*, essay, fun, gamble, go*, good time, indulgence, orgy,… …   New thesaurus

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