flagellation

/flaj'euh lay"sheuhn/, n.
1. the act or process of flagellating.
2. a masochistic or sadistic act in which the participants receive erotic stimulation from whipping or being whipped.
[1400-50; late ME < LL flagellation-, s. of flagellatio. See FLAGELLATE, -ION]

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▪ religious practice
      in religion, the disciplinary or devotional practice of beating with whips. Although it has been understood in many ways—as a driving out of evil spirits, as purification, as a form of sadism, and as an incorporation of the animal power residing in the whip—none of these characterizations encompasses the whole range of the custom. In antiquity and among prehistoric cultures, ceremonial whippings were performed in rites of initiation, purification, and fertility, which often included other forms of physical suffering. Floggings and mutilations were sometimes self-inflicted. Beatings inflicted by masked impersonators of gods or ancestors figured in many Native American initiations. In the ancient Mediterranean, ritual floggings were practiced by the Spartans, and Roman heretics were whipped with thongs of oxtail, leather, or parchment strips, some being weighted with lead.

      In the early Christian church, self-flagellation was apparently imposed as punishment and as a means of penance for disobedient clergy and laity. When plague ravaged Italy in 1259, Raniero Fasani, also known as the Hermit of Umbria, organized processions of self-scourging flagellants who practiced the ritual. Adopted first in Central and Northern Italy, the movement developed into flagellant brotherhoods comprising laypersons as well as clergy and spread from Italy into Germany and the Low Countries in the mid-13th century. In the mid-14th century, flagellants fearful of the Black Death sought by their own efforts to mitigate the divine judgment that they felt to be at hand. In 1349 Pope Clement VI condemned flagellation, as did the Council of Constance (1414–18).

      German flagellants became an organized sect and were a target of the inquisition. The practice gradually subsided, but in the 16th century the Jesuits (Jesuit) temporarily revived lay interest in self-inflicted flagellation, especially in southern Europe. In North America an order of Hopi Indians engaged in flagellation until the late 19th century. Flagellation is currently practiced by some Shīʿite Muslims, who whip themselves on the holiday of Āshūrāʾʿ to commemorate the martyrdom of Ḥusayn (Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī, al-) at the Battle of Karbalāʾ (Karbalāʾ, Battle of) (AD 680).

Geoffrey Abbott
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Flagellation — is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum , whip ) the human body. Specialised implements for it include rods, switches and the cat o nine tails. Typically, whipping is performed on unwilling subjects as a punishment; however, flagellation can also …   Wikipedia

  • flagellation — [ flaʒelasjɔ̃; flaʒɛllasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • XIVe, rare av. XVIIe; lat. ecclés. flagellatio ♦ Action de flageller. ⇒ fustigation. Supplice de la flagellation. ⇒ fouet. La flagellation de Jésus Christ. Flagellation thérapeutique : massage consistant à… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Flagellation — • Includes history and its use in scripture Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Flagellation     Flagellation     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Flagellation — Flag el*la tion, n. [L. flagellatio: cf. F. flagellation.] A beating or flogging; a whipping; a scourging. Garth. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flagellation — (n.) early 15c., the scourging of Christ, from Fr. flagellation or directly from L. flagellationem (nom. flagellatio) a scourging, from pp. stem of flagellare (see FLAGELLUM (Cf. flagellum)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • flagellation — Flagellation. subst. f. v. Il n a guere d usage qu en cette phrase. La flagellation de Nostre Seigneur, pour dire, Le supplice que les Juifs firent souffrir a Nostre Seigneur en le flagellant …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Flagellation — (v. lat.), so v.w. Geißelung, daher Flagelliren, geißeln …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • flagellation — Flagellation, Flagellatio …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • flagellation — [flaj΄ə lā′shən] n. [ME flagellacioun < LL(Ec) flagellatio: see FLAGELLATE] a whipping or flogging, esp. as a religious discipline or for sexual stimulation flagellatory [flaj′lə tôr΄ē] adj …   English World dictionary

  • Flagellation — Cicatrices de flagellation sur un esclave à Baton Rouge, aux États Unis, le 2 avril 1863. La flagellation est un acte qui consiste à fouetter le corps humain avec un fouet, des lanières, ou une tige souple, ou encore tout autres objets… …   Wikipédia en Français

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