eucalyptus

eucalyptic, adj.
/yooh'keuh lip"teuhs/, n., pl. eucalypti /-tuy/, eucalyptuses.
any of numerous often tall trees belonging to the genus Eucalyptus, of the myrtle family, native to Australia and adjacent islands, having aromatic evergreen leaves that are the source of medicinal oils and heavy wood used as timber.
Also, eucalypt /yooh"keuh lipt'/.
[1800-10; < NL < Gk eu- EU- + kalyptós covered, wrapped, akin to kalýptein to cover]

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Any of the more than 500 species of mostly very large trees in the genus Eucalyptus, in the myrtle family, native to Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, and nearby islands.

Many species are grown widely throughout the temperate regions of the world as shade trees or in forestry plantations. Because they grow rapidly, many species attain great height. The leaf glands of many species, especially E. salicifolia and E. globulus, contain a volatile, aromatic oil known as eucalyptus oil, used mostly in medicines. Eucalyptus wood is used extensively in Australia as fuel, and the timber is commonly used in buildings and fencing. The bark of many species is used in papermaking and tanning.

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▪ plant genus
      large genus of mostly very large trees, of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae), native to Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, and nearby islands. More than 500 species have been described. In Australia the eucalypti are commonly known as gum trees or stringybark trees. Many species are cultivated widely throughout the temperate regions of the world as shade trees or in forestry plantations. Economically, eucalyptus trees constitute the most valuable group within the order Myrtales.

      The leaves are leathery and hang obliquely or vertically. The flower petals cohere to form a cap when the flower expands. The fruit is surrounded by a woody, cup-shaped receptacle and contains numerous minute seeds. Possibly the largest fruits—from 5 to 6 centimetres (2 to 2.5 inches) in diameter—are borne by E. macrocarpa, also known as the mottlecah, or silverleaf, eucalyptus.

      The eucalypti grow rapidly, and many species attain great height. E. regnans, the giant gum tree or mountain ash of Victoria and Tasmania, attains a height of about 90 metres (300 feet) and a circumference of 7.5 m.

      The leaf glands of many species, especially E. salicifolia and E. globulus, contain a volatile, aromatic oil known as eucalyptus oil. Its chief use is medical, and it constitutes an active ingredient in expectorants and inhalants. E. globulus, E. siderophloia, and other species yield what is known as Botany Bay kino, an astringent dark-reddish resin, obtained in a semifluid state from incisions made in the tree trunk.

      Eucalyptus wood is extensively used in Australia as fuel, and the timber is commonly used in buildings and fencing. Among the many species of timber-yielding eucalypti are E. salicifolia, E. botryoides, E. diversicolor (commonly called karri), E. globulus, E. leucoxylon (commonly called ironbark), E. marginata (commonly called jarrah), E. obliqua, E. resinifera, E. siderophloia, and others. The bark of many species is used in papermaking and tanning.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Eucalyptus — Eucalyptus …   Wikipédia en Français

  • EUCALYPTUS — Les feuilles de l’Eucalyptus globulus La Bill (myrtacées) renferment des tanins, de l’alcool cérylique, un diphénol (pyrocatéchine), une résine acide et, surtout, 5 à 7 p. 100 d’huile essentielle aux composants multiples, le plus notable étant… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Eucalyptus — Eu ca*lyp tus, n. [NL., from Gr. e y^ well, good + ? covered. The buds of Eucalyptus have a hemispherical or conical covering, which falls off at anthesis.] (Bot.) A myrtaceous genus of trees, mostly Australian. Many of them grow to an immense… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Eucalyptus — Eucalyptus, zu den myrtenblütigen Gewächsen gehörige Gattung, welche sich namentlich in Neuholland und auf den dazugehörigen Inseln in etwa 160 Arten findet. Eucalyptus globulus L. (Eisenveilchenbaum oder blauer Gummibaum), der von dem… …   Lexikon der gesamten Technik

  • eucalyptus — (also eucalypt) ► NOUN (pl. eucalyptuses or eucalypti) 1) an evergreen Australasian tree valued for its wood, oil, gum, and resin. 2) the oil from eucalyptus leaves, used for its medicinal properties. ORIGIN Latin, from Greek eu well + kaluptos… …   English terms dictionary

  • eucalyptus — [yo͞o΄kə lip′təs] n. pl. eucalyptuses or eucalypti [yo͞o΄kə lip′tī΄] [ModL < EU + Gr kalyptos, covered (from the covering of the buds) < kalyptein, to cover, CONCEAL] any of a genus (Eucalyptus) of tall, aromatic, chiefly Australian… …   English World dictionary

  • Eucalyptus — (E. Herit.), Pflanzengattung aus der Familie der Myrtaceae Leptospermeae, 12. Kl. 1. Ordn. L. Arten: sämmtlich neuholländische Bäume. Merkwürdig: E. resinifera, großer Baum, aus dessen verwundeter Rinde in Menge ein röthlicher, herber Saft… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Eucalyptus — Hérit. (Schönmütze), Gattung der Myrtazeen, hohe, meist harzreiche Bäume mit ganzen, meist gegenständigen, etwas lederartigen, in der Regel blaugrünen, bleibenden Blättern, kurzgestielten Blüten mit federbuschartigen Staubfäden in endständigen… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Eucalýptus — L Herit., Pflanzengattg. der Myrtazeen, austral. sehr hohe, meist harzreiche Bäume, ätherisches Öl, Harze und einen roten Saft (austral. Kino) enthaltend. E. globŭlus Lab. (blauer Gummibaum), auch in Südeuropa, berühmt durch seine… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • eucalyptus — (n.) 1809, from Modern Latin, coined 1788 by French botanist Charles Louis L héritier de Brutelle (1746 1800) from Gk. eu well (see EU (Cf. eu )) + kalyptos covered (see CALYPSO (Cf. Calypso)); so called for the covering on the bud …   Etymology dictionary

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