engine

engineless, adj.
/en"jeuhn/, n.
1. a machine for converting thermal energy into mechanical energy or power to produce force and motion.
2. a railroad locomotive.
3. a fire engine.
4. any mechanical contrivance.
5. a machine or instrument used in warfare, as a battering ram, catapult, or piece of artillery.
6. Obs. an instrument of torture, esp. the rack.
[1250-1300; ME engin < AF, OF < L ingenium nature, innate quality, esp. mental power, hence a clever invention, equiv. to in- IN-2 + -genium, equiv. to gen- begetting (see KIN) + -ium -IUM]

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I
Machine that can convert any of various forms of energy into mechanical power or motion.

The steam engines developed during the Industrial Revolution to power stationary machinery were modified in the 19th century to propel locomotives and ships, and were joined later by steam turbines. Internal-combustion engines were developed by Nikolaus Otto and Rudolf Diesel in the late 19th century. Gas turbines and rocket engines came into use in the later 20th century. See also diesel engine, gasoline engine, jet engine, rocket, and rotary engine.
II
(as used in expressions)
internal combustion engine

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      a machine that can convert any of various forms of energy into mechanical power or motion. See diesel engine; gasoline engine; internal-combustion engine; jet engine; rocket; rotary engine; steam engine.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Engine — En gine ([e^]n j[i^]n), n. [F. engin skill, machine, engine, L. ingenium natural capacity, invention; in in + the root of gignere to produce. See {Genius}, and cf. {Ingenious}, {Gin} a snare.] 1. Note: (Pronounced, in this sense, [e^]n*j[=e]n .)… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • engine — UK US /ˈendʒɪn/ noun [C] ► a machine that uses energy to produce movement: »a jet engine »a car/aircraft engine ► something that makes something happen, or that influences it strongly: »For much of the 19th century Britain was the workshop of the …   Financial and business terms

  • Engine — En gine, v. t. 1. To assault with an engine. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] To engine and batter our walls. T. Adams. [1913 Webster] 2. To equip with an engine; said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Engine —   [dt. »Maschine, Motor«], zentraler Teil eines Programms für grundlegende Teilaufgaben (z. B. Grafik Engine zur Ausgabe der Grafikdaten). Manchmal auch verkürzt für »Search Engine« (Suchmaschine) gebraucht …   Universal-Lexikon

  • engine — ► NOUN 1) a machine with moving parts that converts power into motion. 2) (also railway engine) a locomotive. 3) historical a mechanical device or instrument, especially one used in warfare: a siege engine. DERIVATIVES engined adjective… …   English terms dictionary

  • enginé — Enginé, En Oolin, pour Ensorcelé, Enchanté, Charmé, Fascinatus. Ainsi dit on par metaphore, Il est bien enginé de cette femme, Perbelle captus est …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • engine — [en′jən] n. [ME engin, native talent, hence something produced by this < OFr < L ingenium, natural ability, genius < in , in + base of gignere, to beget: see GENUS] 1. any machine that uses energy to develop mechanical power; esp., a… …   English World dictionary

  • engine — c.1300, mechanical device, also skill, craft, from O.Fr. engin skill, cleverness, also trick, deceit, stratagem; war machine (12c.), from L. ingenium inborn qualities, talent (see INGENIOUS (Cf. ingenious)). At first meaning a trick or device, or …   Etymology dictionary

  • engine — *machine, mechanism, machinery, apparatus, motor …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • engine — [n] device that drives a machine agent, apparatus, appliance, barrel, contrivance, cylinder, diesel, dynamo, fan, generator, horses*, implement, instrument, means, mechanism, motor, piston, pot*, powerhouse, power plant, power train, putt putt*,… …   New thesaurus

  • Engine — This article is about a machine to convert energy into useful mechanical motion. For other uses of engine, see Engine (disambiguation). For other uses of motor, see Motor (disambiguation). A V6 internal combustion engine from a Mercedes car An… …   Wikipedia

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