Diyarbakir

/dee yahrdd"buk euhrdd/, n.
a city in SE Turkey in Asia, on the Tigris River. 169,746.
Also, Diarbekr, Diyarbekir.

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Turkey
also spelled  Diyarbekir , historically  Amida 

      city, southeastern Turkey, on the right bank of the Tigris River. The name means “district (diyar) of the Bakr people.” Amida, an ancient town predating Roman colonization in the 3rd century AD, was enlarged and strengthened under the Roman emperor Constantius II, who also erected new walls around the city (349). After a long siege, it fell to the king of Persia in 359. It changed hands frequently in the later wars between the Romans and the Persians and was in Byzantine hands when the Arabs took it (c. 639). With the weakening of ʿAbbāsid control over the region and the emergence of the Ḥamdānid dynasty of Mosul (in Iraq) in the 10th century, Amida was ruled by various Arab, Turkish, Mongol, and Persian dynasties until its capture by the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) sultan in 1516. Capital of a large and important province under the Ottomans, it regained its prosperity. Its location, near the Persian frontier, also gave it strategic importance, and the town was used as a base for armies facing Persia.

      The old town is still surrounded by the ancient black basalt walls that gave it the name Kara (Turkish: “Black”) Amid. The triple walls, an outstanding example of Middle Eastern medieval military art, were greatly expanded and restored during the Arab and Turkish periods; they are about 3 miles (5 km) long and have numerous towers. Industries include woolen and cotton textiles and copper products; it long has been famous for its gold and silver filigree work. Tigris University in Diyarbakır was founded in 1966 as a branch of Ankara University and acquired independent status in 1973. Diyarbakır is linked by air and railroad with Ankara, and the region has a well-developed road network.

      The surrounding region is part of upper Mesopotamia, comprising a large depression crossed by the Tigris River. It is separated from eastern Anatolia by the Taurus Mountains in the north and from the Mesopotamian plain by the Mardin hills in the south; the Karaca Mountain lies to the west. Agricultural products include cereals, cotton, tobacco, and fruits, notably watermelons; mineral deposits include copper and some coal and petroleum. A large proportion of the population is Kurdish. Pop. (2000) 545,983.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Diyarbakir — Diyarbakır …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Diyarbakır — Hilfe zu Wappen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Diyarbakır — Diyarbakir Murailles de la ville. Administration …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Diyarbakir — Diyarbakır Diyarbakır Murailles de la ville. Administration Pays …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Diyarbakır — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Para otros usos de este término, véase Provincia de Diyarbakır. Diyarbakır …   Wikipedia Español

  • Diyarbakir —   [di jɑrbɑkər] , Provinzhauptstadt in Südostanatolien, Türkei, 650 m über dem Meeresspiegel, am rechten Ufer des oberen Tigris, 511 600 Einwohner; katholischer Erzbischofssitz und Bischofssitz einiger orientalischer Kirchen; Universität… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Diyarbakir —    Diyarbakir is often called the unofficial capital of Turkish Kurdistan. Its Kurdish name is Amed. The city boasts an ancient Byzantine wall of black basalt constructed by the Emperor Constantius in 349 and still well preserved. In January 2000 …   Historical Dictionary of the Kurds

  • Diyarbakir — [dē yär΄bä kir′] city in SE Turkey, on the Tigris: pop. 371,000 …   English World dictionary

  • Diyarbakır — Amed / Amid   City   …   Wikipedia

  • Diyarbakir — Original name in latin Diyarbakr Name in other language Amed, Amida, DIY, Diarbakir, Diarbekir, Diarbekr, Diari Bekir, Diari Bkir, Dijarbakir, Dijarbakira, Dijarbakiro, Dijarbakyr, Dijarbakyras, Dijarbekir, Dikranakerd, Diyarbakir, Diyarbakr,… …   Cities with a population over 1000 database

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