Delft

/delft/, n.
a city in W Netherlands. 84,129.

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City (pop., 2001 est.: 96,180), southwestern Netherlands.

Founded in 1075 and chartered in 1246, it was a trade centre in the 16th–17th centuries and was famous for its delftware pottery. It was the birthplace of jurist Hugo Grotius (1583) and painter Jan Vermeer (1632). Landmarks include a Gothic church, a Renaissance-style town hall, and a 17th-century armory. Principal manufactures include ceramics.

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▪ The Netherlands
 gemeente (municipality), western Netherlands. It lies along the canalized Schie River between Rotterdam and The Hague. Founded in 1075 and chartered in 1246, it was severely damaged by fire in 1536 and by the explosion of a powder magazine in 1654. Delft was a trade centre in the 16th and 17th centuries and was famous for its tin-glazed earthenware, or delftware, but was superseded in trade by Rotterdam in the 18th century. Principal manufactures are now ceramics, spirits, oils, penicillin, yeast, and machinery.

      Delft has a technical university, founded in 1842 as the Royal Academy, and hydraulic laboratories where the Delta Plan was designed for the restriction of the Rhine and Meuse estuaries. The medieval Old Church (a Gothic church) contains memorials to the admirals Maarten Tromp (Tromp, Maarten) and Piet Heyn (Heyn, Piet) and to Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (Leeuwenhoek, Antonie van), a native of Delft. The Gothic New Church (formerly St. Ursula's; 1381–1496) contains tombs of the members of the house of Orange-Nassau (that of William I the Silent is by Hendrick de Keyser and his son Pieter) and of the jurist Hugo Grotius (Grotius, Hugo), whose statue is in the marketplace. The Prinsenhof, where William the Silent (William I) was assassinated (1584), was a convent before it became his residence; it is now the town museum. Other landmarks include the Renaissance-style town hall (1618; around a medieval tower), the Armamentarium (a 17th-century armoury), the Paul Tetar van Elven Museum, and the Huis Lambert van Meerten Museum, with an international collection of earthenware tiles. Johannes Vermeer (Vermeer, Johannes) is the best known of the many painters born in Delft. Pop. (2007 est.) 95,379.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Delft — Héraldique …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Delft — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Delft Bandera …   Wikipedia Español

  • delft — /delft/, n. 1. earthenware having an opaque white glaze with an overglaze decoration, usually in blue. 2. any pottery resembling this. Also, delf /delf/. Also called delft ware. [1705 15; after DELFT] * * * City (pop., 2001 est.: 96,180),… …   Universalium

  • delft — blue (characteristic of a popular china developed in the Dutch city of Delft); delft china; delftware …   Eponyms, nicknames, and geographical games

  • delft — /dɛlft/ (say delft) noun 1. a kind of glazed earthenware decorated in colours, especially in blue, made at Delft, a town in the western Netherlands. 2. any pottery resembling this. Also, delf /dɛlf/ (say delf), delftware …   Australian English dictionary

  • delft — (d[e^]lft), n. Same as {Delftware}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Delft — es una ciudad en Holanda Meridional, Países Bajos, a mitad de camino entre Rotterdam y La Haya. La ciudad cuenta con 94.098 habitantes (2005). * * * ► C. del O de los Países Bajos, en la prov. de Holanda Meridional, entre Rotterdam y La Haya; 88… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • delft — [dɛlft] noun English or Dutch tin glazed earthenware, typically decorated by hand in blue on a white background. Derivatives delftware noun Origin C17: from the name of the town of Delft in the Netherlands, where the pottery originated …   English new terms dictionary

  • Delft — /dɛlft/ (say delft) noun a town in the western Netherlands, near The Hague …   Australian English dictionary

  • delft — ► NOUN ▪ glazed earthenware, typically decorated in blue on a white background. ORIGIN named after the town of Delft in the Netherlands, where it originated …   English terms dictionary

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